New Series/Preamble

Okay so I am planning on creating a New Series on Mediation, that will provide beginning meditators with a basic understanding Meditation that they can then use to help provide them with insight and balance throughout their life. Eventually, I think that I will turn this series into an Amazon edition book so that I can be able to share this to a wider audience than just my personal blog. I know that this will be different than the few blog posts that I have made on this website, but I think that it does tie into the transition from College into the workforce. Lately, I have been meditating nearly twice per day so that I can gain balance as well as a better understanding of the emotions I currently am feeling. I know that what I am about to write about might be “first world” problems, but you can visit this video, School of Life: First World Problems if you would like to understand more about them. Either way below After this I will be posting my Introduction to the Series, and I hope that those of you on the interwebs will enjoy!

Applying for Jobs in Ireland

Applying for Jobs in Ireland

In my quest to travel and live abroad following graduation this Spring, I’ve started applying to various jobs in Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand. I know that I should probably be doing the so called “responsible” thing and start to develop a career near to where I live, as according to an article that I read in Inc magazine proximity an applicant’s most important trait (Click here to view the article). Either way I have selected Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand as the three countries where I am conducting a remote job search, since I am eligible for their work-holiday visa programs. I did recently post an article on the various work-holiday visa programs that Americans are eligible, so if you want more information about that go here. This post however, will be specifically about applying for positions in Ireland, so I might make another one for Australia in New Zealand as some of the services I will be reviewing are specific for Ireland.

Jobbio

If you are looking for a more permanent position in Ireland, I would consider looking into Jobbio.com. They also have postings for the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States, but since they are an Irish company I have found that many of their job postings are for Irish firms. The positive thing about this site, is that once you fill out your profile applying for positions is very easy. All you have to do is type in the keywords associated with your chosen field, find a job posting you are interested in, and then hit the “Submit application” button and you’ve applied for that job. Some companies ask that you write a 500-character letter explaining why you are interested in the job, but many of them do not have a cover letter option. I think that this is a good option if you want to quickly apply for a number of jobs, but the one problem I have with it is that with the positions that do not allow you to submit a cover letter. Since I am unable to tell my story to a future employer, it makes me question how competitive I might be during the application process. Either way if you are looking to submit your application to a number of future employers in a short amount of time, then Jobbio is the great option.

Jobs.ie & Indeed Ireland

I have found that Jobs.ie and Indeed Ireland are your traditional job search websites. With these job boards you are able to search for a number of positions in your chosen field and narrow them down by pay, hours and location. Because these application sites are more traditional you are required to spend more time curating your application to the specific position that you are applying for. This allows you to add a cover letter, submit a revised CV, and answer some employer specific questions, but this strength also is a weakness as you have to devote more time to each application. I think that using these more traditional services along with the Jobbio’s rapid-fire application service, might be wise as you can cover a lot of ground with Jobbio, but also submit some high quality applications that could have a better chance of landing you a job.

Work Away

With Work Away you typically will not get paid, but you will receive accommodation and meals in return for some work at hostel, or a farm. This would allow you to have your basics covered for a month or two as you search for work in your chosen local. This is advantageous if you are trying to save money, but you should be warned Work Away hosts tend to be located away from city-centers. Because of this there are a limited number of Work Away opportunities in places such as Dublin, or Cork. If you are looking to hold a longer-term month position in one of these urban districts and use a Work Away experience to help save some money as you conduct a job-search in one of these locales, then it might be wise to apply for a Work Away position earlier than later.

 

wwoof.ie

Much like Work Away wwoof (World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms) allows you to spend time working on an organic farm. This is great if you are looking to spend a few months working in Ireland and then moving onto your next travel destination or returning home. Because Organic Farms are located away from urban centers preforming a job search in those districts will be challenging. Even so with this you can experience rural Ireland, and possibly gain employment in the area around where your farm is located.

 

I hope that this gives you some insight on various places that you can find work before arriving in Ireland. I would also like to note that I found an article on rachelinireland.com that outlines a number of other options that you can take to start working in Ireland. This includes a number of ideas such as, Hostels and Hotels, Au Pairing, Internships with international firms, Retail, Outdoor Centers, Pubs, Seasonal Farming, Temping, and Tour guiding. You can check out this article by going here. I will keep you updated on my progress as I try to find employment abroad, as well as make one on what I have done to search for positions in New Zealand and Australia.

Working-Holiday Visa Crash Course

This post is all about Work-Holiday visas. These visas are different than your traditional employee sponsored work permit or your tourist visa, as they allow you to work within your chosen nation for an extended period of time as well as hold a job during your travels. Since I am American I will be including the various countries that are available to American citizens, as of the date of this blog post. It should be noted that If you are going to a non-English speaking country to teach English, you will typically apply for a work permit and temporary residency visa, which is provided through your future employer’s sponsorship. I should also note that if you have a fair amount of job experience in a field such as Engineering your skill might be listed under a national “Critical Skills” shortlist. If this is your situation it is fairly easy to obtain a work permit and temporary residency without the need for employer sponsorship. If you are interested in teaching English however, you will have to follow the steps I have listed below, but if you have a “critical skill” then skip to the “Apply for your Visa” step. The general way in which you would apply for a traditional visa goes as follows:

 

  1. Go to your target nation’s immigration website. My example for this step will be Canada’s immigration webiste which you can find here 
  2. Apply for a number of jobs, and hope to get accepted
  3. Explain your situation to your employer and if they feel willing or if you have a skill like teaching English that is not easily filled by nationals from your target country have them sponsor you for a visa. It is important to remember that this would be a temporary visa, so you are subject to the nation’s current political whims
  4. Apply for your visa by:
    1. Ensuring that you have a passport
    2. Completing the necessary documents needed to apply for this permit
    3. Making sure that your employer follows through and gives you sponsorship
  5. If asked go in for an interview at the target nation’s consulate or embassy
  6. Wait from anywhere between a few weeks, to a few months to hear back from the immigration office

 

Work-holiday visas are an alternative to the way that visas have traditionally been handled. So long as you are willing to limit your options to Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Singapore, and South Korea, this could be an option for you if you would like to live abroad. I will include links on where you can apply for these visas along with other blogs that will help with this process.

Additional Links:

Creator: 6 Countries Where It’s Easy to Snag a Work Visa

This page has information on a number of different visas along with work-holiday visas that might interest you. I know that it has information on business programs like one in the Netherlands that allows for entrepreneurs to receive temporary residency if they start a new Dutch business.

Go Overseas: The American’s Guide to Working Holiday Visas

I love the Go Overseas website as it has a lot of information about moving, living and working abroad. I got a fair amount of information from this blog post, which I incorporated and added on to with the information below.

I hope you enjoy this post, and if you have any questions or comment feel free to contact me or you can always comment below.

Caroline in the City: Working-Holiday Resources

Caroline in the City is another blog, and this post that I am linking to you has an extensive list about Work-Holiday visas for other nationalities. It also includes a number of travel resources for all of the countries that she has listed that provide Work-Holiday visas.

 

sydney-363244_1280Australia:

So long as you are between the age of 18 and 30, you should be able to apply for this holiday visa. The requirements for this permit are as listed below:

  • Are at least 18 but not yet 31 years of age
  • Don’t have a dependent child with you at any time during your stay in Australia
  • Have a valid passport that is preferably valid for at least 6 months
  • Be outside of Australia when your visa is granted
  • Have not previously entered Australia on a Work-Holiday Visa
  • Have proof of sufficient funds (AUD 5,000, or the equivalent in your own currency)
  • Have a round-trip ticket
  • Meet Australia’s health requirements (make sure that you have not had Tuberculosis or a few other illnesses and you should be alright)
  • Pass a background check
  • And pay a $420 AUD application fee

The great thing about this visa is that your application is that it is submitted online and a decision is usually made within a few days. With this permit you can reside within Australia for twelve months, and then renew it if you wish to say longer, but the one problem with this permit is that you can only be employed by one employer for the maximum of six months. After the six-month period is up you will then have to find another job for the rest of your stay if you want to remain in Australia for the duration of your visa.

Additional Links:

The Work and Holiday visa (subclass 462) Website

This is the website for Australia’s Holiday-Work Visa and most of the information you need to apply for this visa is included here. You can also click here to access a pdf by the Australian government puts all of the information throughout the website linked above in a compact easy to understand document.

The Little Back Packer: Everything You Need to Know About: A Working Holiday in Australia

This a blog written by a woman named Jodie. This post that I have liked above has a fair amount of information on what you should do once you have arrived in Australia. She also has a good travel blog so I would recommend checking it out.

 

 

New Zealand:

The New Zealand work-holiday visa is very similar to the Australian one. The primary difference is that their website is more user friendly and they provide prospective applicants with more resources to find employment before arriving in New Zealand.  The requirements for this permit are as listed below:new-zealand-1805932_1280

  • Are at least 18 but not yet 31 years of age
  • Have a permanent address in the country you are applying from
  • Have proof of medical insurance
  • This must be the first New Zealand Work-Holiday Visa that you have applied for
  • You must have at least $4,200 NZ (the equivalent in your own currency) and be able to prove that you have those funds
  • You must have a return ticket out of New Zealand or have additional funds that you can use to leave the country
  • A valid passport
  • Pass a background check
  • You must also be in good health; they can require you to have a chest x-ray or medical examination as proof that you are healthy.
  • You must not have dependents such as children during your stay.

New Zealand is a beautiful nation and this permit allows you to work in New Zealand for up to 12 months, and study or train for up to 6 months. Just like Australia you cannot have dependents, which is a universal requirement for these visas as they do not want to provide services to your dependent while you are in the country. You are also unable to accept a permanent position within the country so if you want to have a contract it would be best to go the route of employer sponsorship. I should also note that this application is made online, so it will be easy for you to complete it and within twenty days you should receive a response.

Additional Links:

New Zealand Immigration Working Holiday Visas –

This is the Working-Holiday visa application and resource page. There is a ton of information on the government website, along with resources about job placement. I should not that each country listed has a different Working Holiday Visa scheme, so click here for the United States variant, or if you are from another nation please find your nation listed on the webpage linked above.

New Zealand Now: Finding and Applying for Jobs

This is another New Zealand government website that outlines how to apply for a job in New Zealand as well as offers a variety of resources for your job search.

Spin the Windrose: Travelling to New Zealand on a Working Holiday Visa? Read this.

This is, “a blog about long-term, responsible travel on a budget,” which documents this woman named Abbi and her travels around the globe. The blog post that I am linking above describes how she applied for her visa, and the various steps she took after arriving in New Zealand.

Go Overseas: Insider Tips for a New Zealand Working Holiday 

This is a Go Overseas blog post, which outlines the steps to apply for this working-holiday visa, as well as what you should do upon arrival. There is also review of New Zealand’s various major cities as well as a guides on setting up bank accounts, places to travel to and information on how to get around New Zealand.

 

dublin-2018503_1920Ireland

If you want to live in Europe, and you are from the United States then Ireland is a viable option for you. With this visa there are no age restrictions, but you must be enrolled in a university or have graduated within the past 12 months. So you can apply for this if you’re in your sixties, but you will have to be a college student, or a recent graduate. The application process is a two-step process, but the general requirements are:

Step 1 –

  • To complete and sign the appropriate paper work
  • A passport that is valid for at least a full year after your entry
  • Two passport photographs with your name on the back side of it
  • Your current CV/resume with at least two references
  • Evidence that you are currently a full time student or have recently graduated, this can be done by providing a diploma that has been issued within the past 12 months or official college transcripts
  • A bank statement that shows that you have at least $4000 dollars USD
  • To pay the $339 processing fee.

Step 2 – (Assuming that your consulate has approved you to move onto Step 2)

  • To have purchased return tickets
  • To have proof of medical and travel insurance for the duration of your trip. The duration will be determined by the dates on your tickets
  • Your US passport will then be reviewed again to ensure that it will be valid for at least one year after your date of entry

Ireland does not use an online system to approve visas, so because of that you will have to submit your visa by mail. It appears that it takes around 2-3 weeks for your visa to be processed, however, according to Rachel in Ireland she was able to be approved within one week. So I guess it varies depending on how many applicants there are. One benefit to the Irish work-holiday visa is that there are no limitations to how long or where you can work. For New Zealand and Australia, you would be unable to gain a contract position and there were limited for how many months you could work under one employer, but for Ireland there are no restrictions so long as it is legal and respects Irish labor laws.

Additional Links:

Consulate General of Ireland | Boston: US-Ireland Working Holiday Agreement

This is the Irish consulate in Boston’s website, which has information on their Working Holiday visa. As I am from Maine I pounced on the consulate in Boston, but if you are from a different part of the United States, then it would be best to consult the Irish Embassy’s consulate directory linked right here. You also can access the application form by going here, but the general information and requirements necessary to get this visa can be seen your area’s consulate’s page on the working holiday authorization.

Rachel in Ireland: My Irish Working Holiday

This is a blog post about how to apply for a working-holiday authorization for the Ireland. Rachel’s blog is based upon her time in Ireland, so because of that she has a lot of information about her time there, finding work, where to visit, and so on. I should also add that https://rachelinireland.com is her old website, and now it is http://celtandkiwi.com/

Go Abroad: How to Live and Work in Ireland on a Working Holiday Visa

This is a Go Abroad article that outlines the preliminary steps necessary before and right after your arrival in Ireland. This includes some information about opening a bank account, traveling and getting a phone. I’ve always found that Go Abroad is a good resource on world travel, since their articles outline a lot of the common issues and misstates that travelers make so you can have the best experience possible.

Singaporesingapore-1959463_1280

Singapore might not be the first country that you would think of for a work-holiday visa program. While New Zealand, Australia, and I believe Ireland do not have a quota for the number of visas they might grant, Singapore does. They appear to be rather selective and only grant 2,000 visas to individuals who have attended some of the world’s best universities, specifically you must have attended one that is among the world’s top 200 universities. The general requirements for this visa is that:

  • You are between the ages of 18 and 25
  • That you a graduate or under graduate from one of the world’s top 200 universities. You can see if your university makes the mark by visiting this website
  • You must have been a resident and full time student of the University if you have gradated and if you are currently a student you must be a resident and a full-time student who has been enrolled for at least three months.
  • Submit the required documents
  • Provide a letter from the university stating your matriculation, name nationality, gender and date of birth
  • Provide a copy of your diploma or a copy of your transcripts if you have graduated
  • If you have yet to graduate, then provide a copy of a student card that has been issued by your university
  • It should be noted that all documents must be in English, or translated into English, which then should be accompanied by the proper translation certification
  • Pay the $150 USD issuing fee

Applying for this visa appears to be more involved, but Singapore has many opportunities, and this six-month visa would allow you to taste what Singapore offers. It should be noted that takes around three months for this visa to be processed, so it is best to plan ahead. I would like to add that since Singapore’s Working Holiday Program is more selective than many other nations it was challenging to find other blogs and links about it. Below I have two links and one of them is a blog that I found, which has more information about its specific Work-Holiday visa if you are interested.

Additional Links:

Ministry of Manpower: Work Holiday Programme

This is the Ministry of Manpower’s Work Holiday Visa Program’s website, which has all of the pertinent information necessary to apply for this permit.

Travel Dave: Singapore Working Holiday Visa

Dave is an adventure traveler that has traveled all over the world, and one of his blog posts is about the application process for a Singaporean Work-Holiday visa. He provides some detailed information about how to use an agent to help you with the application process for this visa, along with what you should do after arriving in Singapore.

 

South Korea

South Korea also has a Work-Holiday visa program, which allows for US citizens to remain work and travel in Korea for 18 months and other participating nations for 12 months. I found the ineligibility conditions to be rather comical as they included, “Dancer, Singer, Musician, or Acrobat.” If you are not a dancer, singer, musician, acrobat, work in an adult entertainment-related business, requiring specific licenses or skills, a foreign language instructor, seeking training or education, interested in a career related to journalism, religion, or research, or if you intend to go to South Korea for the primary goal of working, then you can move onto the general requirements for this permit. The general requirements are:fall-1757275_1920

  • Between the ages of 18 and 30 at the time of the visa application
  • Intend to enter South Korea within 12 months after the visa’s issuance
  • Have a valid passport
  • A recent photograph that has been taken within the past three months
  • Proof of a round trip airline ticket
  • Proof of financial support or other documents that show you have sufficient funds to support yourself for at least 3 months. This totals around $10,000 USD
  • Proof of your student status, or diploma from an accredited University. If you have graduated, you will have had done so within the past 12 months to be eligible
  • Additional documents such as a Criminal Report, and Medical Exam might also be required as required documents differ from embassy to embassy, so they suggest that you contact your embassy for further details as these requirements are subject to change.
  • You may be asked to be interviewed at a South Korean consulate, so keep that in mind and it should be noted that all documents you provide will not be returned.

This visa is available to Australian, French, Canadian, Japanese, New Zealander, and American citizens. Unlike the other visas where it is generally acceptable to go to these countries to work and sustain yourself, which can then be followed by some vacations, this visa appears to be primarily for those who wish to spend more time in South Korea and pick up side work to supplement their travels. If South Korea interests you, this can be an excellent option to spend some more time exploring the nation while participating in some side jobs that can give you a unique cultural experience.

Additional Links:

Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in New York: H-1 Visa (Including WEST Program)

This is the Consulate General in New York’s page on the Korean Working Holiday (H-1) Visa. I could not find a blog on the process for applying for this Work-Holiday visa, so if you can find one that would be great, but in terms of applying for this visa the link above should give you a good start to the process.

 

I hope that this will provide you with a good introduction on applying for Visas, and what a Work-Holiday visa entails. If you have any questions or comments, please either comment below or send me a message through the “Contact” tab above.

 

Happy Traveling!

Writing Example I

I would like to include an example of writing so that you might have an initial barometer of my current writing level. This essay that I am including below was one that I wrote for a course on the black death. I enjoyed researching and writing it, so for that I will be include it on my website. I would like to say that if you have any questions, or comments please do not hesitate to contact me and I will do my best to respond as quickly as possible.

Best,

-Edward

writing-example-i

English as a Second Language Certificates & Teaching English Abroad:

There are many opportunities to teach English abroad for native English speakers, but before teaching it is important that you have the right qualifications. The base qualifications that are typically required before applying and being accepted for an English teaching position are the TEFL, TESOL, and CELTA. Each one of these certificates are unique unto themselves and provide each future English teacher with a different range of skill at varying prices.

TEFL – The TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) probably the most common English teaching certificate.  This being said there is no real standardization around this certificate so a TEFL is more or less a blanket term for a wide range of programs that are held at variety of organizations. Because of this you can receive a TEFL certificate from an online course at the steep price of $35 from groupon.com, but you can also receive one from a local university that is better and at a much higher price. If you do get a TEFL certificate, it is also important to explain where you got it from, what the requirements were to pass that course, and what you think your TEFL certificate can bring to the classroom. It is important to remember that your education will help give you the needed confidence in our teaching abilities to be an effective teacher. I would recommend that if you do get a TEFL certificate, to try and get one from an accredited institution that will really push you to become the best English teacher you can be. Also it is important to remember that most employers will want you to have at least a 120-hour certificate, even if it is in the PRC, so don’t get tempted by a quick 40-hour certificate, because it will be far below the necessary teaching requirements.

TESOL – The TESOL and the CELTA are both standardized programs as compared to the unstandardized TEFL. The TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) is an examination offered by the Trinity College in London, and has acted as an alternative to the CELTA exam. The TESOL tends to be more readily available than the CELTA, which makes it a good option if there is not a CELTA center in your area, and it also tends to be much cheaper than the CELTA exam. The standardization of this program makes it a much better option than the TEFL as your employer will have an understanding of the course that you have taken. With that in mind it is important to note that at TESOL will be much more expensive than a TEFL, but with that extra cost comes student teaching, and a greater depth of knowledge in the mechanics of being a teacher.

CELTA – The CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) has been seen as the “gold-standard” for a preliminary English teaching certificate. These certificates are approved by Cambridge University, and are provided by Cambridge approved testing centers. There is also an individual sent by Cambridge to oversee each CELTA class, as well as provide feedback to each CELTA student. This certificate is much more expensive than the other and ranges between £900 and £2500. The cheapest tuition that I found was in Belgrade Serbia for £900 and the most expensive one that I found was in San Francisco in the United States for £2500. I should also note that you typically have to pay the tuition in pounds and then pay for housing along with other fees in the local currency. CELTA courses can also be taken on either a full-time, a part-time basis, with the full-time course lasting around one month, while a part-time course might last for three months. Some institutions also offer an online/inclass option, which typically lasts around four months, where you do your work on your own time, while periodically checking in with an instructor. This course option does require students to do in class teaching which would be done over the course of one to two weeks at the specific testing center. Another regulation that is important to know with the CELTA is that if you miss a class, you end up forfeiting your certificate, so make sure you’re not sick during that three to one-month period.

If teaching English abroad is something that interests you, these courses are all options that you can take to get the certifications necessary to teach. I should also note that almost every employer will require you to have a Bachelor’s degree, so if you do not have that, and wish to become an English teacher, it is almost a requirement to get the Bachelor’s degree first. When I was applying to various CELTA programs (I should probably note that I am a little biased to the CELTA), it was a requirement that you have your college degree before the course’s scheduled start date. With that being said there has been rumored that there are some language schools in the PRC that will accept teachers without their Bachelor’s. I would personally stay away from those institutions, as it is national law that all teachers have received higher education.

I hope that this article was informative and somewhat enjoyable to read. If you have any questions about any of this, I am by no means an expert, but I have spent a fair amount of time researching how to become an ESL teacher. I will also include some links below on how to find schools that offer these certificates and some good YouTube Channels about teaching ESL abroad.

***

YouTube Channels: Most of the channels that I have spent time watching are about Westerners teaching English and living in China. Many of their earlier videos were on teaching English in China, but as their channels have grown they have spent more time focusing on Chinese culture. It is great to watch their newer videos on China, but for the purposes of this article I would just do a quick search on their channel page for teaching English

BenTeachesEnglishOverseas: I should note that he has taught in China, but has also taught English in a number of other countries across the globe.

https://www.youtube.com/user/GetRICHTeaching

Frank Macri:

https://www.youtube.com/user/franklyvlog

laowhy86:

https://www.youtube.com/user/laowhy86/featured

serpentza:

https://www.youtube.com/user/serpentza/featured

Prozzie:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-ZtFYBGX6JFlfTyhB-GS4g

Links: For finding TESOL and TEFL schools I would just do a search around the lines of “Your City TESOL or TEFL certificate.” You can also do searches for online TEFL certificates, these will not be accredited, but if you are looking for a cheap way to reach the minimum requirements for many of the jobs in China and Southeast Asia this is a good option. If you are looking for a CELTA certificate, I would recommend taking a look at the link below. Cambridge English’s search feature is really nice since you can quickly find CELTA certified school anywhere across the globe without being bogged down with articles like mine talk about the CELTA rather than the specific schools you would be interested in contacting. I wish you all the best with your search in whatever you might do.

http://www.cambridgeenglish.org/find-a-centre/find-a-teaching-centre/

I wish you the best in whatever you dream to do

…Four More Months? eek!

Okay so it’s the end of January now, graduation is in May and I don’t have any clear set options open for when that date of May 15th rolls along and I’m part of the “Work Force.” I know that most people probably have some sort of plan, like I’m going to work for XYZ company, or I’m going to be full time at my kick-ass summer job, unfortunately this is not my situation.

With this predicament comes great opportunity – the world is your oyster and anything can happen, be made, or fostered out of this pit of uncertainty. I know that I’m not keen on becoming whatever hot sales, product marketer, or insurance job is listed on Indeed.com, so that leaves me with a variety of options, which differ from the traditional path that the typical college graduate might follow. I know that my friends who have already graduated work at bars, or insurance agencies, or banks, or non-profit organizations moving drinks or papers from one end of a table to another. This could be very exciting and I’m sure that the office, or bar drama, especially the bar drama, is rather exciting, but I hope to do something different with the few years I have until assets start to tie myself down. I have had some ideas on what I hope to do next, but one arrives as the next one disappears into the abyss it emerged from.

I do want to work in a field that I find interesting, something that I might be able to receive some enjoyment from, rather than customer service, which I hate with some of the strongest passions found upon this humble planet. I have thought about teaching abroad, becoming a pilot/working in the travel industry in some sort of fashion, finding some sort of remote work that I could do abroad, and creating a business that I could operate abroad. All of these are a work in progress, but the one thing that I am leaning towards is creating a location independent cooperation, or finding remote work in whatever industry might need my services.

I hope to share my worries, anxieties, and concerns with all of you since this is something that I am dealing with and if it helps someone in a similar situation that would be awesome. Also by doing this it might help me put my ideas into words, which then can be read by people who might be able to receive some value from this unique time in my life. Anyways I hope that this small article was enjoyable, and I hope to be posting another one soon.

Best,

-Edward